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Author Topic: HTC-459-354-FN RG Mold in the 45-70  (Read 572 times)

cornmastah

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HTC-459-354-FN RG Mold in the 45-70
« on: February 06, 2018, 03:46:33 PM »
Had some fun with the socom/45-70 bullet using the deeper hollow point pins.

https://youtu.be/6zzr8QJ3VL8

762sultan

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Re: HTC-459-354-FN RG Mold in the 45-70
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2018, 05:57:35 PM »
I try and watch all of your videos because of all the info and the techniques  that are demonstrated. One thing I haven't seen much about is temperature of the mould or furnace. I know that you use a hotplate to get moulds up to temp but you don't have your moulds drilled for a probe. So how do you keep track of it? Do you use a thermometer in the furnace? Just was curious as I use a thermometer and have the mould drilled and keep an eye on both. I have a PID but don't use it for all of my furnaces. Years ago I did nothing, except when the lead was able to pour I began making bullets. But they didn't turn out very well. I was just wondered what rule of thumb you go by because you always make great looking bullets.

cornmastah

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Re: HTC-459-354-FN RG Mold in the 45-70
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2018, 10:20:03 PM »
When I use the RCBS pot I always have a thermometer in the pot to watch temp--although the RCBS seems to maintain temp quite well.  It has a temp dial, but it is off a little--so I just know where to put the dial and don't change it much.  The lyman has the digital pid which makes it easy to set and maintain temps of the lead.  As far as the mold temps go, I heat the molds on a hotplate--and I know what setting on the dial gets em to about 400 degrees.  I can pull the mold off the hotplate and cast with it and get good bullets immediately.  As far as maintaining the temp of the mold, I usually go with the timing it takes for the sprue to freeze.  If it starts taking longer than I think it should, I either cool the molds down with a moist towel wadded up--or I switch to casting with two molds and get a good rhythm or pace going.

I try and watch all of your videos because of all the info and the techniques  that are demonstrated. One thing I haven't seen much about is temperature of the mould or furnace. I know that you use a hotplate to get moulds up to temp but you don't have your moulds drilled for a probe. So how do you keep track of it? Do you use a thermometer in the furnace? Just was curious as I use a thermometer and have the mould drilled and keep an eye on both. I have a PID but don't use it for all of my furnaces. Years ago I did nothing, except when the lead was able to pour I began making bullets. But they didn't turn out very well. I was just wondered what rule of thumb you go by because you always make great looking bullets.

 



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