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Author Topic: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM  (Read 281 times)

Guy_From_Michigan

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Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« on: December 24, 2018, 05:54:04 AM »
Does anyone know where i can get some load data (a place to start and a max would be GREAT for this mould NOE HTC459-354-FN used in a 458 SOCOM? I can not seem to find any. I am just now starting using QuickLoad software but I am not ready to just start using powders it recommends. I tried it with one load I know what powders to use and it did not suggest either one of the powders the loading manuals told me.

Intel6

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Re: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2018, 06:26:27 PM »
What powders are you looking to use?

Todd S

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Re: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2019, 01:33:16 PM »
Does anyone have a good starting seating depth for these. I am getting a sticky bolt with seating at the crimp groove. I want to be careful with seating too deep. BTW the mold drops gorgeous bullets.

Intel6

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Re: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2019, 03:20:46 PM »
First I would make sure it is not your case sizing by trying an empty case in the chamber before loading to see if it is indeed bullet interference causing your problem.  I have tight chamber in my RRA upper and I have to load the bullet to the crimp groove when using PC. If I use HiTek them I can seat them out a bit further. The other thing is to make sure the chamber is clean because When I was experimenting with powders I was getting unburned powder in the chamber and that was causing issues until I started cleaning it out. Now I use this bullet as my standard load with AA1680 since it is a bit faster than some powders it burns cleaner for me. I can shoot over 100+ loads without having to clean out unburned powder.   

Squigie

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Re: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2019, 03:28:12 PM »
Does anyone know where i can get some load data (a place to start and a max would be GREAT for this mould NOE HTC459-354-FN used in a 458 SOCOM? I can not seem to find any. I am just now starting using QuickLoad software but I am not ready to just start using powders it recommends. I tried it with one load I know what powders to use and it did not suggest either one of the powders the loading manuals told me.
Be careful with Quickload predictions for .458 SOCOM.  Its algorithm doesn't work well for the cartridge, and the predictions should not be trusted.  They're nearly always extremely generous and dangerously optimistic.

The only way to really "dial in" QL for .458 SOCOM is by tweaking powders individually until you match real world performance, and then maintaining a powder database specific to the cartridge (because they will no longer be suitable for usable predictions with other cartridges).
Even then, I know of only one person that successfully dialed in the program for the cartridge.  It took almost 10 years ... and a hard drive failure wiped everything out.  :o


The best advice that I can offer you is to pick up some Shooter's World SBR-SOCOM powder.  It is the best powder I have found for the cartridge (and its big bore wildcats) - especially with 'standard weight' bullets.  Though data is extremely scarce for SBR-SOCOM, specifically, the powder is extremely close to Shooter's World Blackout and Accurate 1680, since they're all based on the same basic bulk powder (Explosia D63) which was sold in North America as Accurate 1680 for many years.  A1680 data has served me well as a starting point, or basic idea of where to start (I often back off a little more, just to be safe).
Stop increasing the charge weight when the rifle cycles properly and the ejection pattern indicates proper pressure levels.  If you see pressure signs, you're WAY over 35k psi.


Seating depth will be determined by chamber dimensions.  If you have a Rock River or Tromix barrel, the throat is likely to be so tight that .459" bullets may get sticky; but you can seat very long without hitting the lands.  Other brands are a crapshoot.  Some are tight.  Some are sloppy.  Some have short throats.  Some have long throats.

AlvinYork

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Re: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2019, 11:43:32 PM »
You can use the Lovex D063 powder entry in QL for SBR-SOCOM. I should be the same stuff with the standard 10% variance from lot to lot.

Squigie

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Re: Load Data for HTC459-354-FN in 458 SOCOM
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2019, 03:58:33 PM »
Indeed.
But, without changing the powder's properties, it still isn't any more useful than any other powder in QL, in regards to .458 SOCOM.
QL can't handle the cartridge unless you tweak a lot of variables. 

It'll still spit out highly optimistic velocities, and dangerously optimistic powder charges that range from 10% to 20% (by charge weight) over real world max. (Typically resulting in a 50-100% increase in pressure.)

With .458 SOCOM (and its wildcats) using components with no specific data available, it's best to just interpolate from existing, known-good data for whatever you can find that's reasonably close.
That's the ONLY way that I can get reasonably safe data for the .475 Tremor. Only thirteen are known to have been made, and only two of the owners share data (myself being one).  So, there's basically nothing out there.  I use .458 SOCOM starting loads for similar bullets, and work up.  I do have the added benefits of a longer throat, higher expansion ratio, and more case capacity, though.  Those factors result in lower pressure and provide me a bit more of a safety cushion when initially testing a load.  (The longer throat leads to gas sealing issues with starting loads that turn out to be too low pressure, though.  ...Everything has its drawbacks.  There is no free lunch... ::) )

 



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